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Start with calcium. How does your intake compare with the DRI?  What percentage of your recommended intake did you consume?

Mineral Intake Assignment  So that your answers are easier to read and grade, please use multiple paragraphs and breaks between nutrients.

Start with calcium. How does your intake compare with the DRI?  What percentage of your recommended intake did you consume? List the foods from your diet record that contributed the greatest amount of calcium (be sure to record the amount of calcium each food provides). If you consumed less than the recommendation, what foods could you incorporate into your diet in order to meet the recommendation?  Why is calcium an important part of your diet? If you consumed more than the recommendation, was this too much? Why or why not? How does your intake compare with the Tolerable Upper Level (UL) for calcium, which is shown on page C at the end of your text, following the index.  Are there risk factors associated with over consumption of calcium? If so, what are they?
Next, consider your three-day average daily intake of sodium. In order to calculate your average daily intake of sodium, you must account for the sodium you add to foods when you cook or eat. D&W+ doesn’t know, for example, that you sprinkle salt on your hamburger before you eat it. Estimate the average daily amount of sodium you add to your food (1 tsp salt = 2,300 mg sodium) when you cook or eat. If you use a salt shaker, measure out the amount you would normally add to your food, using a teaspoon for ease. Add this estimate to the average daily intake of sodium from your D&W+ results.  Compare your three-day average daily sodium intake with the recommendation. (Is that a recommended minimum or maximum?) What percentage of the recommended intake did you consume?  List the foods from your diet record that contributed the greatest amounts of sodium. What types of foods have the most sodium? What are the disadvantages of too much dietary sodium? How could you alter your diet or cooking methods to reduce your sodium intake?
Now consider your three-day average daily intake of magnesium.  How does your intake compare with the DRI?  What percentage of your recommended intake did you consume? List the foods from your diet record that contributed the greatest amount of magnesium (be sure to record the amount of magnesium each food provides). If you consumed less than the recommendation, what foods could you incorporate into your diet in order to meet the recommendation?  Why is magnesium an important part of your diet? If you consumed more than the recommendation, was this too much? Why or why not? How does your intake compare with the Tolerable Upper Level (UL) for magnesium, which is shown on page C at the end of your text, following the index.  Are there risk factors associated with over consumption of magnesium? If so, what are they?
Address the same questions for potassium that you answered for magnesium.
Now turn to zinc and answer the same questions.  In addition, discuss guidelines that should be followed to be sure of obtaining enough zinc from the foods you eat.
Go onto iron and answer those same questions.  Also consider the foods that contributed the greatest amount of iron.  Which were meats? Legumes? Greens?  Other? Are enriched or whole-grain products important to your iron intake?   Are there ways to increase the absorption of iron in your diet?
Finally, consider the trace elements iodine and fluoride. List the sources of iodine in your diet.  Since D&W+ does not include iodine, you will need to find that information in your text and by reading food labels. What about fluoride? Are you obtaining fluoride through your water source?  Find out by contacting your city or county health department and report what you learn.

 

 

 

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